BooksOfTheMoon

Blackthorn Winter (Comet Weather, #2)

By Liz Williams

Rating: 3 stars

Picking up a few months after Comet Weather, Blackthorn Winter once again follows the lives of the four Fallow sisters, this time in the deep midwinter, around Christmas and the early new year. While the last book was very much an ensemble piece, this one feels much more like Serena’s story – with her latest collection being shredded just before Fashion Week and Christmas. Poor Luna gets hardly any chapters from her point of view and while Bee gets a bit more to do, her part of the story seems vague and unfocused, and Stella is often relegated to being Serena’s sidekick.

Part of what I loved about Comet Weather was its deep attachment to place, and rural place. Magical London has been done to death, but having contemporary magic in rural England felt fresh to me[1]. This one is more focused around London, and less around the Fallow family home in Somerset. That makes it feel less special to me.

We did get a lot more of Ward in this book, and I really enjoyed that. He’s a plummy chap, I imagine as a mid-career Hugh Grant, perhaps, but he’s not thrown by the magical world he’s thrown into, and his devotion to Serena is a pleasure to read. We also get a new character, Ace, who’s somewhat mysterious, but fun as well.

The major problem with this book, which was an issue in the previous one too, but somehow left less so, is that the sisters are mostly quite passive. Things happen to them, and they’re often saved by other people, but don’t often get to do any heroics themselves. They’re mostly wandering around in the dark while others hoard their dark secrets (looking at you, Alys!). There’s also a lot of threads left untied. We still have no idea where Alys was off to, or what agreement she has with the Hunt, or why various magical things are after (or, indeed, want to protect) the Fallows. And after feeling like Nell had some secret in the last book, she isn’t even mentioned in this one.

So I found it a little frustrating, but still enjoyable. If there are more books in the series (which I very much hope there are), I shall certainly read them.

[1] yes, I know we’ve had Alan Garner and many others doing that sort of thing, but this series is resolutely twenty first century, rather than 1970s or earlier

Book details

ISBN: 9781912950799
Publisher: NewCon press
Year of publication: 2021

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